Summer Backpacking in the Gorge

To say that the Red River Gorge Geological Area is a popular attraction is an understatement. I cannot give accurate annual statistics in regards to visitor usage, but believe me, there are days (weekends and holidays) with long lines at both ends of Nada Tunnel, when trail-head parking overflows, when the Red River itself becomes … Continue reading Summer Backpacking in the Gorge

August Update

Dawn in the Red River Gorge Geological Area Greetings, all! I am back, my apologies for lack of activity. I have been acutely focused on my job, and though I have much to contribute here, I haven't been able to until recently. It really picked-up in May, and more in June and July with visitor … Continue reading August Update

I Love Rainy Days…

It is a truth that fewer people (in general) go out hiking in wet weather. Popular trails and points of interest usually thick with visitors and summer-outers become sparse or even empty. But those of us who do go out in the "less than favourable" weather are rewarded with solitude and sometimes spectacular views of … Continue reading I Love Rainy Days…

The Clifty Wilderness

Of all the places here, in and around the Red River Gorge, my favourite spot would have to be the Clifty Wilderness. At close to 13,000 acres, Clifty borders the adjacent Red River Gorge Geological Area, with its own share of natural arches as well as rugged terrain. My previous post depicted some parts of … Continue reading The Clifty Wilderness

New Job at Daniel Boone National Forest

Well folks, I am pleased to announce that I will be heading down to Kentucky for a Forest Service job next month. I will be a lead backcountry ranger intern working in the Red River Gorge Geological Area. A portion of the Gorge is designated as the Clifty Wilderness, with some 12,600 acres of rugged … Continue reading New Job at Daniel Boone National Forest

Cathedral Pines Preserve

Over 300 years ago, long before the American Revolution and French and Indian War, back in the early days of the colonies, the first settlers must have looked upon the vast forests of spire-like trees with awe...and some trepidation. Many explorers and naturalists were delighted to find an assortment of tree varieties which bore striking … Continue reading Cathedral Pines Preserve